Majors Value Meter: U.S. Open Rankings

Majors Value Meter: U.S. Open Rankings

This article is part of our Majors Value Meter series.

Below are RotoWire's rankings for the 122nd U.S. Open, which begins Thursday at The Country Club in Brookline, Mass. 

This list is an asset for any betting format, from office pools to sportsbooks to fantasy golf and all their offshoots.

"Brookline" – as the course is often referred to – has played host to three U.S. Opens, lastly in 1988, when Curtis Strange won the first of his back-to-back titles in an 18-hole playoff over Nick Faldo. But the course is unquestionably most known for two seminal moments in golf history: First, in 1913, when 20-year-old amateur Francis Ouimet stunningly won the Open in a playoff over English greats Harry Vardon – he of the Vardon Trophy – and Ted Ray.  And second, in 1999, when Justin Leonard sank what turned out to be the Ryder Cup-clinching putt on the 17th hole, sending his U.S. teammates pouring onto the green in jubilation. There has been only significant championship held at Brookline in the ensuing two-plus decades, the 2013 U.S. Amateur won by Matt Fitzpatrick. Seventeen golfers in this field took part in that tournament, including semifinalist Corey Conners and quarterfinalist Scottie Scheffler, plus Justin Thomas, Xander Schauffele, Bryson DeChambeau, Will Zalatoris and Max Homa.

As in 1988, the Open will be contested at a composite course of the 27 holes on The Country Club property – and 18-hole main course and an adjacent 9-hole track. It will be longer than the 7,010 yards on

Below are RotoWire's rankings for the 122nd U.S. Open, which begins Thursday at The Country Club in Brookline, Mass. 

This list is an asset for any betting format, from office pools to sportsbooks to fantasy golf and all their offshoots.

"Brookline" – as the course is often referred to – has played host to three U.S. Opens, lastly in 1988, when Curtis Strange won the first of his back-to-back titles in an 18-hole playoff over Nick Faldo. But the course is unquestionably most known for two seminal moments in golf history: First, in 1913, when 20-year-old amateur Francis Ouimet stunningly won the Open in a playoff over English greats Harry Vardon – he of the Vardon Trophy – and Ted Ray.  And second, in 1999, when Justin Leonard sank what turned out to be the Ryder Cup-clinching putt on the 17th hole, sending his U.S. teammates pouring onto the green in jubilation. There has been only significant championship held at Brookline in the ensuing two-plus decades, the 2013 U.S. Amateur won by Matt Fitzpatrick. Seventeen golfers in this field took part in that tournament, including semifinalist Corey Conners and quarterfinalist Scottie Scheffler, plus Justin Thomas, Xander Schauffele, Bryson DeChambeau, Will Zalatoris and Max Homa.

As in 1988, the Open will be contested at a composite course of the 27 holes on The Country Club property – and 18-hole main course and an adjacent 9-hole track. It will be longer than the 7,010 yards on which Strange and Faldo shot 6-under, but not much. It will be 7,264 yards, though it now will play as a par-70 instead of 71, with just two par-5s. The cut line in 1988 was 4-over. Like with last month's PGA Championship at Southern Hills, Brookline has undergone Gil Hanse renovations, in 2013 and 2019, according to the official Golf Course Superintendents' fact sheet.

There are 156 players in the field with 60 and ties making the cut. Almost half the field was determined through local and final qualifying around the United States, Canada and Japan. The 10 leading players from the four-event DP World Tour Qualifying Series not already exempt received a berth, as did the Order of Merit leaders on the Asian, Australasia and Sunshine Tours. There are 16 amateurs in the field denoted with an (a) and 17 golfers who went through local qualifying listed separately at the bottom.

The golfers are broken down into six categories:

  • Favorites
  • Contenders
  • Making the Cut
  • Borderline
  • Long Shots
  • Local Qualifiers

These rankings were compiled before the completion of the Canadian Open – and the maiden LIV Golf event in London. Thirty-one golfers in the U.S. Open field were competing in Canada, and 12 more were in the 48-man LIV field.

Any changes to the field will be updated here.

Editor's Note: Video Summary of This Article

FAVORITES

1. Scottie Scheffler
Even though Scheffler missed the cut at the PGA Championship, there's no question he deserves the top spot. He almost won for a fifth time this year a few weeks ago at Colonial. Scheffler has played only two U.S. Opens as a pro and one of them was a tie for seventh last year at Torrey Pines.

2. Justin Thomas
This will be Thomas' eighth U.S. Open and his record has been mixed. He has two top-10s and two more top-25s, but he's never finished better than eighth. That came two years ago at Winged Foot. Thomas has had a great year in which he kept sniffing the winner's circle in his new star-partnership with caddie Bones Mackay before breaking through for his second major title last month at the PGA Championship.

3. Rory McIlroy
We all know the Rory storyline: stuck on four majors for eight years, and it's been a surreal 11 years since his U.S. Open triumph at Congressional. He's had six top-10s at the Open, including the past three years, and he also has finished in the top-10 in both majors so far in 2022.

4. Will Zalatoris
Zalatoris has not even won a PGA Tour event, much less a major, but he certainly warrants this spot. In eight career majors he has five top-8s, including sixth at the Masters in April and then runner-up at the PGA, plus a tie for sixth at the 2020 U.S. Open at Winged Foot. Zalatoris missed the cut at last year's Open. He's coming off a top-5 at the Memorial.

5. Cameron Smith
Smith's best finish in six U.S. Opens was a T6 at his debut at Chambers Bay in 2015. He has yet to crack the top-35 since and Open tracks would not appear to be his best chance at a major. That said, he's far improved from even a year ago, when he missed the cut at Torrey Pines. He's more complete now, and he offered further proof with his first good result ever at the Memorial two weeks ago. He was third at the Masters and 13th at the PGA. Short-game skill looks to be important his week, and Smith surely brings that to the table.

6. Jordan Spieth
Spieth has won a U.S. Open – in 2015 at Chambers Bay. But his Open record is spotty at best, with no other top-10s in 10 starts. And even the win came at a quirky, non-traditional Open track and was gifted to him by Dustin Johnson. But we've also seen a different Spieth of late, one relying much more on his long game than short game. He'll need both this week to walk away with the trophy.

7. Jon Rahm
Rahm is the defending champion, having won at one of his favorite tracks, Torrey Pines. He doesn't have that going for him this time around, or nearly the quality of play he was showcasing 12 months ago. He's fallen from No. 1 in the world and finished a mere 48th at the PGA last month. Yes, he won at Mexico, but it was a very weak field.

8. Xander Schauffele
Never finishing lower than seventh in five career U.S. Opens make a pretty compelling case to rank Schauffele in the top-7. So maybe slotting him eighth is too low! But that wasn't the thought process here, just that he usually shows up in majors. That said, he did miss the cut at the Masters. He has rebounded with a 5-13-18 stretch, the middle result coming at the PGA.

9. Matt Fitzpatrick
We'll hear a lot this week that Fitzpatrick won the 2013 U.S. Amateur at Brookline, and against a bunch of guys in this field, including Scheffler. The course has been renovated since then, but Fitzpatrick's game is good on just about any course. His seven Opens feature a pair of T12s in 2018-19. He was 14th at the Masters and in the final pairing with Mito Pereira at the PGA before finishing fifth. A win would be a surprise but not a huge one.

10. Sam Burns
We all know what Burns has been doing, winning twice this season and thrice in a little over a year. But his major record has not followed suit, as he has missed half of his eight cuts with only one top-25. The good news for Burns is, that top-25 came just last month with a tie for 20th at the PGA, offering evidence that Burns is well on his way to overcoming this problem.

11. Max Homa
Much like Burns, Homa has been collecting tournament wins in rapid fashion. Also like Burns, he had been terrible in majors. In fact, he's never even made a cut in three U.S. Opens. But after making the cut at the Masters, he tied for 13th at the PGA, presenting evidence, again like Burns, that he is maturing into a fully rounded golfer. A win this week might be too big of a leap, but a top-10 is not.

12. Collin Morikawa
Morikawa is this high based on what he's done in the past – two major wins, fourth last year at Torrey Pines – and what he's capable of doing. If it were based on recent play, he'd be far lower. Morikawa is fourth on Tour in Strokes Gained: Approach, which is down slightly from his customary first or second. He's also only 33rd in greens in regulation and, with his wedge game falling apart this season, he'll needs to be almost flawless with his irons this week. 

CONTENDERS

13. Shane Lowry
Lowry has shown this season that he can contend in tough fields on tough courses. But of late, he has not done his best work at U.S. Opens. He was ninth in 2015 and co-runner-up to Dustin Johnson at Oakmont in 2016. In the next five Opens, he has zero top-25s. After a T3 at the Masters in April and then a T23 at the PGA, Lowry clearly is playing well enough to reverse his recent Open trend.

14. Hideki Matsuyama
Heading into his 10th U.S. Open, Matsuyama has a good but not great track record: a pair of top-10s, including a co-runner-up in 2017 at Erin Hills, four other top-25s and almost another last year with a T26 at Torrey Pines. He's had two wins in the past eight months and was 14th in the defense of his Masters title.

15. Patrick Cantlay
Cantlay's record in majors is perhaps the most perplexing in golf. He's a top-3-ranked player without a top-10 in his past 11 majors. And never in a U.S. Open, though he does have three top-25s in six starts, and he's never missed a cut. There's no obvious reason for this – Cantlay's game can play anywhere – so presumably it will end at some point.

16. Tony Finau
Finau was in the final pairing at the 2018 U.S. Open and the 2019 Masters. He finished fifth both times. In the past four years at the Open, he has two top-8s and two missed cuts, one of them last year. Finau has had mediocre finishes at the first two majors of 2022, but he also had a pair of recent top-5s before teeing it up at the Canadian Open.
  
17. Sungjae Im
The Masters has proven to be Im's best major. At the U.S. Open, he was 35th last year and 22nd the year before. With a shorter track this time around, we could see an improved result. Im is riding two top-10s and two top-25s in his past four starts, including T8 at Augusta. He missed the PGA with COVID.

18. Viktor Hovland
Hovland is somewhat similar to Sam Burns and Max Homa in that he has won multiple titles while doing poorly at majors. He's been in 10 and has never had so much as a top-10. That will change at some point, perhaps this year, though he couldn't even crack the top-25 in the first two of 2022.  If his iron play is elite, he could largely bypass his woeful wedge game. But that's a big ask on a U.S. Open course.

19. Dustin Johnson
Yes, Johnson is way down here. But it's not far from his current and dropping world ranking. He has a great history at Opens, winning in 2016 at Oakmont among six top-10s in 14 starts. He was 19th last year. But he hasn't been at his best for more than a year now and he just left the PGA Tour for LIV Golf and made his debut at the London tournament.

20. Mito Pereira
Pereira was the best golfer at the PGA Championship for 71 holes. He was playing well heading into Southern Hills and, impressively, continued playing well after his 72nd-hole disaster when others could've gone into a tailspin. Pereira was seventh at Colonial the week after the PGA, then 13th at the Memorial. The PGA was just his second career major.

21. Cameron Young
It's shaping up as quite a Rookie of the Year battle among Young, Pereira and Davis Riley, and Young might be in the lead right now. He was second at the Genesis, third at the RBC Heritage, second at the Wells Fargo, then third again at the PGA, where he made his first major cut in four starts. Young is ranked 18th on Tour in Strokes Gained: Tee-to-Green, the key metric in all of golf.

22. Joaquin Niemann
The 23-year-old has already played in 13 majors. But he has zero top-10s and only two top-25s, though one came last time out with a tie for 23rd at the PGA. We could see a similar career ark for Niemann as with Sam Burns and Max Homa, which means we should start to see improvement in majors. Niemann's other major top-25 was at the Winged Foot Open in 2020.

23. Davis Riley
We come to our first player who had to proceed through qualifying. Riley played the Columbus, Ohio, qualifier the day after another high finish at the Memorial qualified easily. He is the best golfer who had to go through qualifying, and it's reflected here. Riley has run off five straight T13s-or-better, including a T13 at the PGA. That was his third career major after two U.S. Open missed cuts in 2015 and 2020.

24. Tommy Fleetwood
Fleetwood has not been able to recreate his back-to-back top-5s at the 2017-18 U.S. Opens, which included a runner-up to Brooks Koepka in the second one. It was only recently that Fleetwood broke out of a funk that extended virtually the entire length of the pandemic. He was 14th at the Masters and fifth at the PGA.

25. Tyrrell Hatton
Hatton has had some great majors. But he's missed the cut in almost half of his 28 starts (13), including the past two U.S. Opens. He's cashed in both 2022 majors so far, with a nice T13 last month at the PGA. Hatton has not missed a cut in 11 worldwide starts in 2022, with a best of them being a runner-up at Bay Hill. His best U.S. Open was a T6 in 2018.

MAKING THE CUT

26. Brooks Koepka
Koepka can finish 26th, he can finish sixth, he can finish 86th. He can win. After all, he's won two U.S. Opens in 2017-18, with three other top-5s, including his past two starts in 2019 and 2021 (he missed 2020). So placing Koepka this far down doesn't not come risk-free. But he's played only 10 times in 2022, and missed four cuts, including at the Masters. He was then 55th at the PGA and hasn't played since.

27. Billy Horschel
Horschel is now the 11th-ranked golfer in the world coming off a win at the Memorial. But you'd never know it from his major track record. He hasn't so much as cracked the top-30 in his past five U.S. Opens. And he has only seven top-25s in 34 career majors. But there's no denying Horschel is coming into Brookline on a high.

28. Daniel Berger
This will be Berger's eighth career U.S. Open, and he's had two excellent results, including a tie for seventh last year at Torrey Pines. He's also coming off a top-5 at the Memorial in one of his best showings of 2022. Berger ranks very highly across all the strokes-gained categories except putting. Brookline puts a premium on accuracy, and it should help mitigate his lack of length off the tee.

29. Webb Simpson
The 2012 U.S. Open winner at the Olympic Club, Simpson had a nice Open run going before missing the cut last year. He had made four straight cuts with two top-10s and another T16. Last year's MC is his only one in his past 21 majors. Simpson is struggling to stay inside the top-125 at make the FedEx Cup playoffs, but his veteran savvy should play well at this difficult course.

30. Louis Oosthuizen
Oosthuizen is the first golfer on this list who played the LIV Golf opener last week in London and has renounced his PGA Tour membership. His U.S. Open track record is stellar, with seven straight top-25s, the last three of which have been top-10s, including runner-up and third the past two years. Oosthuizen's game has slumped this season, especially his putting, so it will be interesting to see whether he can continue his great Open run.

31. Corey Conners
Conners has not made a cut in three U.S. Open starts, including the past two years. He tied for sixth at the Masters in April but then missed the cut at the PGA before tying for 13th at the Memorial. He of course played the Canadian Open, being one of the hometown fan favorites. Conners was a semifinalist in the 2013 U.S. Amateur at Brookline. He ranks fourth on Tour in greens in regulation.
 
32. Abraham Ancer
Ancer has excelled at the PGA and the Masters, but not so much at the two Opens. While he's made two of three cuts at U.S. Opens, he's done nothing better than a T49 at Pebble Beach three years ago. Ancer was ninth at the PGA last month, his best stroke-play finish all yea in what has been a subpar PGA Tour season to date.

33. Aaron Wise
Wise made a last-minute dash to get into the top-60 in the world rankings to avoid an Open qualifying tournament. A runner-up at the Memorial moved him from 88th to 44th OWGR. Wise has a great game for a U.S. Open, but he's had trouble getting in the field. This will be his first start since a T35 in 2019, after two previous missed cuts. Wise has made his past six major cuts, most recently a tie for 23rd at the PGA last month.

34. Russell Henley
Henley has gotten progressively better in his past three U.S. Opens, going from 27th in 2017 to 25th in 2018 to 13th last year at Torrey Pines. He's made his past 13 cuts in U.S.-based majors, including the first two of 2022. Henley is ranked second on Tour in Strokes Gained: Approach and 12th in Tee-to-Green, a formula that would almost assure another made cut.

35. Talor Gooch
Gooch has become a different golfer in the past year, moving into the top-50 in the world rankings, and now he's really become a different golfer by playing in the LIV opener in London. This will be just his second U.S. Open and first in five years. He rides four straight made major cuts into Brookline, including top-20s at both the Masters and PGA this year. Gooch impressively is ranked 19th in SG: Approach, fourth in Around-the-Green and 26th in Tee-to-Green.

36. Keegan Bradley
The U.S. Open has been Bradley's worst major – just four made cuts in nine starts – though it's hard to figure out why with a game so well suited for these kinds of courses. He's missed the cut at the past three Opens, though did tie for fourth way back in 2014. Bradley has been on a tear of late, zooming into the top-50 OWGR to avoid having to qualify thanks to a top-5 at THE PLAYERS and a runner-up at the Wells Fargo.

37. Seamus Power
The 35-year-old Power was never in a major before this year, and now he's two for two – impressively tying for 27th at the Masters and ninth at the PGA. So this will be his first U.S. Open. Power is ranked top-50 on Tour in driving accuracy, top-10 in greens in regulation and top-30 in Strokes Gained: Putting, a wonderfully balanced blend.

38. Brian Harman
Harman gallantly challenged Koepka at Erin Hills in 2017 before finishing as co-runner-up. He's made all three U.S. Open cuts since then, including a top-20 last year at uber-long Torrey Pines. Harman missed the cut at the Masters before a respectable T34 at the PGA. He is ranked 12th on Tour in driving accuracy, a very good sign for the week ahead.

39. Harold Varner III
This will be Varner's first U.S. Open in four years and only third lifetime. He's yet to make a cut. But he's made five of his past six major cuts overall, including both this year, with a top-25 at the Masters that could've been so much better save for a third-round 80. He also famously shot an 81 in the final round of the 2019 PGA in the final pairing with eventual winner Koepka. Varner's big miss is off the tee, and he will need to improve his driving accuracy to reach the weekend.

40. Adam Scott
This will be Scott's 21st U.S. Open. He's made the cut in eight of the past 10 years, including three in a row coming in. He is one for two in 2022, making the cut at the Masters but missing at the PGA. Scott is getting only 55 percent of his drives in the fairway, and that stat will go a long way in determining whether he sticks around for the weekend.

41. Sergio Garcia
Just back from LIV land and the London tournament, Garcia is set for his 23rd U.S. Open. He's missed only four cuts and has 12 top-25s, including last year's T19. London was just Garcia's 10th start in 2022. He's missed only cut. He was top-25 at the Masters and then at the Wells Fargo before MCing at the PGA.

42. Patrick Reed
The ever-controversial Reed withdrew from the Canadian Open before the start, then announced he was heading to LIV. But he didn't play in London. The former Masters champ has had pretty good success at U.S. Opens, making seven cuts in eight starts with five top-20s, including the past two years. But this season has been his worst overall in years. Reed's once-elite short game is still better than average, but with a ranking of 172nd in Strokes Gained: Tee-to-Green, better than average isn't good enough.

43. Tom Hoge
Hoge won for the first time at Pebble Beach and has continued to play well, making the cut at the Masters and then tying for ninth at the PGA. In fact, Hoge has made the cut in his past six majors dating to 2019, two of them U.S. Opens. He's ranked eighth on Tour in Strokes Gained: Approach this season.

44. Alex Noren
Noren has missed the U.S. Open cut in five of his eight starts, but lately he's had top-25s two of the past three years, including last year. Statistically, he's better than average across the board, highlighted by a ranking of 20th in Strokes Gained: Putting. Noren has missed only three cuts in 2022, but carries two straight into Brookline, one when he was on the wrong side of the draw at the PGA.

45. Lucas Herbert
The 26-year-old Aussie is coming off his best major, a tie for 13th at the PGA. Before that, he missed the cut at his first Masters. He's one for two in his U.S. Open career, tying for 31st in 2020. He didn't play last year's Open. Herbert is as imbalanced statistically as any golfer on Tour: 179th in Strokes Gained: Off-the-Tee and 200th in Approach, yet 16th and third in Around-the-Green and Putting. Somehow with those wacky numbers, he's missed only three of 12 cuts all year.

46. Sebastian Munoz
Enjoying a pretty good run of late, Munoz looks to make a dent for the first time at a U.S. Open. This will be his fourth, and he has two MCs sandwiching a T59 in 2020. He's made only four cuts in 10 career majors, with one of them coming last month at the PGA. Munoz arrives having made 10 straight cuts, and he led for much of the recent Byron Nelson before tying for third.

47. Kevin Na
Na, who quit the PGA Tour and played in the LIV opener in London, has never been great in the majors, with the U.S. Open and PGA his biggest trouble spots, which makes sense as they tend to be the longest. He's made only five of 10 Open cuts and has missed the past three. But he's been playing quite well coming in, making six straight cuts before London, including top-25s at both majors and three other top-15s. As this isn't a super long track for a U.S. Open, Na's chances to reach the weekend greatly improve.

48. Adri Arnaus
The 27-year-old Spaniard who won earlier this year on the DP World Tour climbed into the top-60 of the world rankings to qualify. He's coming off a tie for 30th at the PGA, and his lone U.S. Open was a made cut in 2019. He's also played an Open Championship. Arnaus has been in only one non-major PGA Tour event in his career, a missed cut at Mayakoba in 2018.

49. Justin Rose
The 2013 winner at Merion has been all or nothing the past six years: two top-10s, four missed cuts, including the past two years. That's not far different from his recent play on Tour: four missed cuts in his past six starts, one of which came at the Masters. But then Rose turned around to tie for 13th at the PGA. To further the enigma, Rose has played 16 U.S. Opens and made only half his cuts, but seven of them have been top-25s. 

50. Jason Kokrak
The 37-year-old Kokrak has been a very late bloomer. He's been in only 20 career majors, but he's played in every one the past three years. His record is not great. His tie for 14th at the Masters in April is his best showing ever; he then made the cut at the PGA. This will be Kokrak's sixth U.S. Open and he's made three cuts. He is ranked only 109th in Strokes Gained: Tee-to-Green this season, and his putting is down from a year ago, yet he's missed only one cut in 2022.

51. Si Woo Kim
Kim tied for 13th in his debut U.S. open in 2017, then went MC-MC-MC before tying for 40th last year. He's missed the cut in more than half of his 21 career majors, though that percentage has gotten better the past few years. He's made the cut in both majors this year, and two of three in each of the two years before that. Aside from poor putting, Kim's stats are average or better than average across the board. He's missed only one cut in 16 starts in 2022.

52. Lanto Griffin
Griffin has had a fairly good season and, after making the cut at the PGA, used the Columbus, Ohio, qualifier to reach his fourth U.S. Open. He's made the cut the past two years, tying for 35th at Torrey Pines in 2021. Griffin has made 11 of 14 cuts in 2022 and is ranked in the top-50 on Tour in Strokes Gained: Approach.

53. Luke List
List is emerging from a big slump that followed his maiden PGA Tour win at the Farmers in January. He's made three of his past four cuts, including at the PGA Championship and the Memorial. List is zero for five in U.S. Open cuts, but three of them oddly came before 2010 and he last played in one in 2019. He's a far better golfer now, ranked top-10 on Tour in SG: Off-the-Tee and Tee-to-Green, and top-25 in Approach.

54. Ryan Fox
The 35-year-old New Zealander has been on a tear in Europe, and he was one of the 10 golfers who made this field via a four-event DP World Tour Qualifying Series. The big-hitting Fox finished eighth, second and second while playing in three of the four events. In between, he came over here and made the cut at the PGA. Fox has played in three U.S. Opens, making the cut in 2018 before missing the next two years.

55. Kevin Kisner
Kisner tied for 44th at the Masters in April, but he's missed his past four cuts on Tour heading into Brookline, including at the PGA. As with Na, Kisner should benefit this week from a shorter-than-usual U.S. Open track. He's made five of eight cuts at the Open, and one of those was last year at uber-long Torrey Pines.

56. Cameron Tringale
Tringale is ranked 54th in the world and he tied for 41st at the PGA last month. He has been in only two Opens, and none since 2015, when he made the cut. Tringale has made six of his past seven cuts coming in. He's under 60 percent in driving accuracy on the season, something he'll need to improve on to make it to Saturday.

57. Sepp Straka
Straka has taken a huge step forward on Tour this season, winning the Honda but also tying for third at Harbour Town, adding a top-10 at THE PLAYERS and making the cut in both majors. He's made 13 of 15 cuts overall in 2022. Straka has played in only one U.S. Open and he made the cut, tying for 28th in 2019 at Pebble Beach. His strokes-gained stats are remarkably bad for all he's done in 2022, but he's getting it done somehow, and that's what matters.

58. Stewart Cink
Cink is set for his 85th major, and he's had a remarkably successful career in them. He's made two-thirds of his cuts, playing similarly well in all four, but of course that's separate from winning the 2009 Open Championship victory. Cink has made 15 of 21 cuts at the U.S. Open with seven top-25s. He's coming off a top-25 at the PGA. He's hasn't slowed down appreciably with age, having made seven of his past 10 major cuts. He just figures out how to get around the course.

59. Rikuya Hoshino
The 63rd-ranked Hoshino is set for his sixth career major. He reached the weekend at the PGA last month and tied for 26th last year at the U.S. Open. He got here via the Dallas qualifier.

60. Marc Leishman
Leishman has now tumbled out of the top-50 in the world. He made the cut at both 2022 majors – 30th at the Masters, 34th at the PGA – and has been able to make the cut most weeks, but he hasn't had a top-25 since February. The U.S. Open has not been his best major, with just six made cuts and one top-25 in 11 starts.

BORDERLINE

61. Bryson DeChambeau
DeChambeau would obviously be far higher if he were healthy. On the mend from wrist surgery, he returned to golf at Colonial and missed the cut by a lot. That was a few weeks ago and he hasn't played since.

62. Martin Kaymer
Kaymer withdrew from the tournament, replaced by alternate David Lingmerth
The 2014 U.S. Open winner has fallen outside the top-200 in the world rankings, but he can still bring it on occasion. Such as last year, when he tied for 26th. Overall, Kaymer has made 10 of 14 U.S. Open cuts.

63. Thomas Pieters
Pieters revitalized his career with two DP World Tour wins in the past seven months. But he's had trouble reaching the weekend when playing in the States. He missed the cut at the Genesis, THE PLAYERS and the Masters, had a decent week at Bay Hill and managed to make the cut at the PGA, albeit finishing far, far back. Pieters has made only one cut in three U.S. Opens, tying for 23rd in 2020.

64. Adam Hadwin
Hadwin was a very late entry in the field, as a Dallas qualifier alternate, only after Paul Casey withdrew. He has the game to make his way around Brookline. He's made four six cuts at U.S. Opens, including last year's T40.

65. Mackenzie Hughes
Hughes got into the field via the Dallas qualifier. He tied for 15th last year, though that was the first time he had made an Open cut in four tries. If Hughes' short game is at its finest, he surely can make the cut this week.

66. Joohyung Kim
Still only 19, Kim is getting into this first U.S. Open and third career major as the leader on the Asian Tour. He missed the cut at the PGA last month but before that tied for 17th at the Byron Nelson. Kim is ranked 64th in the world.

67. Francesco Molinari
Molinari is far from the player who won the Open Championship in 2018 (which is how he qualified for this U.S. Open) and came close to winning a second major a year later at the Masters. But curiously, he was 13th at the U.S. Open last year, 16th in his prior start in 2019. Molinari made the cut at the PGA last month, part of a run of three in row coming into Brookline, including the Memorial last time out.

68. Gary Woodland
Woodland did little at the U.S. Open before winning in 2019 at Pebble Beach and has done little since, though he did make the cut last year. When his game is on, it's built for U.S. Opens. It just that his game has rarely been on in Opens and it's not been on much in 2022. Woodland has missed half his 14 cuts this year and is ranked 114th in the world.

69. Patrick Rodgers
Rodgers needed the Columbus, Ohio, qualifier to get here, but he's been pretty successful in past Opens. He's made all three cuts, including T31 last year. This will be his first major of 2022. Rodgers missed the cut at THE PLAYERS.

70. Denny McCarthy
McCarthy has been in five majors and made five cuts, including the PGA the past three years. He's one for two overall at the U.S. Open but hasn't played it since 2016. He's now back after getting through the Columbus, Ohio, qualifier. Ranked 121st in the world, McCarthy has made 10 straight cuts and is coming off a top-5 at the Memorial.

71. K.H. Lee
Lee had never made a cut in a major until tying for 41st at the PGA in his sixth try. He's zero for three at the U.S. Open, including last year. But Lee is a better player than a year ago, having recently won the Byron Nelson for a second straight year. He is ranked 50th on Tour in Strokes Gained: Off-the-Tee and 66th in Tee-to-Green.

72. Branden Grace
This will be Grace's 10th U.S. Open, and he's had some great results, including his third career top-10 just last year. But ranked 123rd in the world now, he's not the same golfer he once was. He's missed seven of 12 cuts in 2022. Grace was playing at the LIV opener in London.

73. Phil Mickelson
Making the cut was going to be a challenge for the 51-year-old Mickelson even before taking all these months off as the LIV controversy swirled. He returned to action to play in London.

73. Min Woo Lee
Lee's sister, Minjee Lee, just won the Women's U.S. Open, so this would be quite the parlay. Lee is top a top-50 player on the men's side and was just 14th at his first Masters before missing the cut at the PGA. He has not enjoyed success on the PGA outside of the Masters, otherwise missing seven straight cuts in stroke-play events coming in.

75. Harris English
English had been out since January following hip surgery before returning at the Charles Schwab a couple of weeks ago. He missed the cut by a good margin. It seems too much to ask to ramp up that quickly for a major, but otherwise English would be ranked far higher.

LONG SHOTS

76. Christopher Gotterup
The 2022 Haskins Award winner as the nation's most outstanding college golfer made his pro debut at the Canadian Open. He got here via the New York qualifier. Gotterup, who attended Oklahoma, played the Puerto Rico Open earlier this year as an amateur and tied for seventh.

77. Erik van Rooyen
13th major. 4th U.S. Open (T23, 2020). Missed past five major cuts. Ranked No. 76 OWGR.

78. Kurt Kitayama
7th major. 2nd U.S. Open (MC, 2020). Dallas qualifier. Ranked No. 140 OWGR.

79. Joel Dahmen
9th major. 3rd U.S. Open (two MCs). Columbus, Ohio, qualifier. Ranked No 128 OWGR.

80. Scott Stallings
12th major. 3rd U.S. Open (T53, 2013). Dallas qualifier. Ranked No. 147 OWGR.

81. Adam Schenk
2nd major. 1st U.S. Open. Columbus, Ohio, qualifier. T41 at 2022 PGA. Ranked No. 172 OWGR.

82. Richard Bland
7th major. 3rd U.S. Open (T50, 2021). Ranked No. 67 OWGR.

83. Troy Merritt
12th major. 4th U.S. Open (58th, 2020). Springfield, Ohio, qualifier. Ranked No. 98 OWGR.

84. Beau Hossler
8th major. 4th U.S. Open (T29, 2012). Springfield, Ohio, qualifier. Ranked No. 160 OWGR.

85. Shaun Norris
9th major. 2nd U.S. Open (MC, 2020). Sunshine Tour leader. Played LIV tournament in London. Ranked No. 68 OWGR.

86. Jinichiro Kozuma
2nd major. 1st U.S. Open. Dallas qualifier. Ranked No. 106 OWGR.

87. Guido Migliozzi
3rd major. 2nd U.S. Open (T4 2021). Ranked No. 169 OWGR.

88. Satoshi Kodaira
11th major. 3rd U.S. Open (T46 2017). Canada qualifier. Ranked No. 314 OWGR.

89. Chan Kim
11th major. 5th U.S. Open (all MCs). Columbus, Ohio, qualifier. Ranked No. 107 OWGR.

90. Sam Horsfield
7th major. 4th U.S. Open (all MCs). DP World Tour Qualifying Series. Ranked No. 74 OWGR.

91. Keita Nakajima (a)
2nd major. Qualified by winning 2021 Mark H. McCormack Medal as world's top amateur. Played in 2022 Masters (MC) after winning 2021 Asia-Pacific Amateur Championship.

92. Kalle Samooja
2nd major. 1st U.S. open. DP World Tour Qualifying Series. Ranked No. 134 OWGR.

93. Andrew Putnam
9th major. 4th U.S. Open (T43 2019). Columbus, Ohio, qualifier. Ranked No. 150 OWGR.

94. Thorbjorn Olesen
24th major. 4th U.S. Open (all MCs). DP World Tour Qualifying Series. Ranked No. 182 OWGR.

95. Matthew NeSmith
2nd U.S. Open (MC 2015). Dallas qualifier. Ranked No. 163 OWGR.

96. Danny Lee
12th major. 4th U.S. Open (T57, 2016). Columbus, Ohio, qualifier. Ranked No. 284 OWGR.

97. Wyndham Clark
4th major. 2nd U.S. Open (MC, 2021). Columbus, Ohio, qualifier. Ranked No. 293 OWGR.

98. Victor Perez
8th major. 3rd U.S. Open (two MCs). DP World Tour Qualifying Series. Ranked No. 93 OWGR.

99. Sebastian Soderberg
2nd U.S. Open (MC, 2016). DP World Tour Qualifying Series. Ranked No. 195 OWGR.

100. Taylor Montgomery
2nd major. 2nd U.S. Open (MC, 2021). San Francisco qualifier. Ranked No. 211 OWGR.

101. Joseph Bramlett
3rd U.S. Open (2 MCs). Maryland qualifier. Ranked No. 246 OWGR.

102. Nick Taylor
7th major. 3rd U.S. Open (T36, 2009). Dallas qualifier. Ranked No. 237 OWGR.

103. Jim Furyk
84th major. 26th U.S. Open (won 2003). Qualified as 2021 Senior U.S. Open winner.

104. Hayden Buckley
2nd U.S. Open (MC, 2021). Columbus, Ohio, qualifier. Ranked No. 250 OWGR.

105. Jonas Blixt
12th major. 2nd U.S. open (MC, 2014). Canada qualifier. Ranked No. 1,437 OWGR.

106. Marcel Schneider
2nd major. 1st U.S. Open. European Qualifying Series. Ranked No. 189 OWGR.

107. Yannik Paul
1st major. DP World Tour Qualifying Series. Ranked No. 196 OWGR.

108. Jediah Morgan
1st major. Australasian Tour leader. Ranked No. 239 OWGR.

109. Wil Besseling
1st U.S. Open. DP World Tour Qualifying Series. Ranked No. 247 OWGR.

110. Andrew Novak
1st major. Dallas qualifier. Ranked No. 357 OWGR.

111. Harry Hall
1st major. Georgia qualifier. Ranked No. 235 OWGR.

112. Brandon Matthews
1st major. New York qualifier. 2022 Korn Ferry tournament winner. Three-time Latinoamerica winner. Ranked No. 285 OWGR.

113. Brian Stuard
11th major. 7th U.S. Open (T65, 2013). Springfield, Ohio, qualifier. Ranked No.  263 OWGR.

114. Callum Tarren
2nd U.S. Open (MC, 2019). Canada qualifier. Ranked No. 429 OWGR.

115. Kevin Chappell
20th major. 8th U.S. Open (T3, 2011). Maryland qualifier. Ranked No. 549 OWGR.

116. Richard Mansell
2nd major. 1st U.S. Open. DP World Tour Qualifying Series. Ranked No. 273 OWGR.

117. Bo Hoag
2nd U.S. Open (MC, 2021). Springfield, Ohio, qualifier. Ranked No. 483 OWGR.

118. MJ Daffue
1st major. Springfield, Ohio, qualifier. Korn Ferry Tour player. Ranked No. 290 OWGR.

119. Grayson Murray
3rd major. 2nd U.S. Open (MC, 2013). Maryland qualifier. Ranked No. 548 OWGR.

120. Nick Hardy
4th major. 4th U.S. Open (T52, 2015). 156th golfer to get into this field. Springfield, Ohio, qualifier alternate. Ranked No. 383 OWGR.

121. Roger Sloan
1st major. Dallas qualifier. Ranked No. 322 OWGR.

122. Chase Seiffert
1st major. Georgia qualifier. Ranked No. 452 OWGR.

123. Sam Bennett (a)
1st major. Columbus, Ohio, qualifier. Texas A&M grad. 2022 1st-team All-American.

124. Sean Crocker
2nd major. 1st U.S. Open. Dallas qualifier. DP World Tour player. Ranked No. 218 OWGR.

125. James Piot (a)
2nd major. 1st U.S. Open. 2021 U.S. Amateur winner. Played in LIV tournament in London.

126. Jesse Mueller
3rd. major. 2nd U.S. Open (T51, 2012). San Francisco qualifier. Won Club Pro Championship to reach 2022 PGA (MC).

127. Tomoyasu Sugiyama
1st major. Japan qualifier. T57 at 2021 ZOZO Championship. Ranked No. 310 OWGR.

128. Stewart Hagestad (a)
6th major. 4th U.S. Open (all MCs). 2021 Mid-Amateur champion.

129. Laird Shepherd (a)
3rd major. 1st U.S. Open. 2021 British Amateur champion.

130. Adrien Dumont de Chassart (a)
1st major. Springfield, Ohio, qualifier. Illinois fifth-year senior. Two-time Big Ten Player of the Year.

131. Todd Sinnott
1st major. Japan qualifier. Asian Tour player. Ranked No. 426 OWGR.

132. Fred Biondi (a)
1st U.S. Open. Florida qualifier. University of Florida fifth-year senior.

133. Daijiro Izumida
1st major. Japan qualifier. Ranked No. 601 OWGR.

134. Ben Silverman
1st major. Dallas qualifier. Ranked No. 1,194 OWGR.

135. Austin Greaser (a)
1st major. Runner-up at 2021 U.S. Amateur. North Carolina junior.

136. William Mouw (a)
1st U.S. Open.  San Francisco qualifier. Pepperdine junior.

137. Maxwell Moldovan (a)
1st major. Springfield, Ohio, qualifier. Ohio State junior. 

138. Travis Vick (a)
1st major. Dallas qualifier. University of Texas junior.

139. Nick Dunlap (a)
1st major. 2021 U.S. Junior Amateur winner. Age 18. Alabama commit.

LOCAL QUALIFIERS

Listed alphabetically

140. Fran Quinn
5th U.S. Open (T43, 1994). New York qualifier. 57 years old. Four-time Korn Ferry winner, two-time Asian Tour winner, plays occasionally on Champions Tour.

141. Michael Thorbjornsen (a)
2nd U.S. Open (79th, 2019). New York qualifier. Age 20, Stanford junior. 2018 U.S. Junior Amateur champion (beat Akshay Bhatia in finals).

142. Sam Stevens
1st U.S. Open. Springfield, Ohio, qualifier. Age 25. Oklahoma State grad. Plays on Korn Ferry Tour. Won Latinoamerica Tour event in 2021.

143. Isaiah Salinda
1st U.S. Open. Oregon qualifier. Age 25. Played at Stanford. 2019 Walker Cup player. 2018 U.S. Amateur semifinalist. Plays on Korn Ferry Tour.

144. Matt McCarty
1st U.S. Open. Georgia qualifier. Age 24. Santa Clara grad. Plays on Korn Ferry Tour.

145. Chris Naegel
2nd U.S. Open (T56, 2018). Columbus, Ohio, qualifier. Age 39. Played on Korn Ferry Tour in 2021.

146. Davis Shore
1st. U.S. Open. Dallas qualifier. Age 23. Alabama grad. Plays on Latinoamerica Tour.

147. Ryan Gerard
1st. U.S. Open. Florida qualifier. Age 22. North Carolina grad. Plays on PGA Tour Canada.

148. Luke Gannon
1st U.S. Open. San Francisco qualifier. Age 25. Southern Illinois alum. Plays on PGA Tour Canada.

149. Keith Greene
1st U.S. open. Florida qualifier. Age 29. Plays on PGA Tour Canada.

150. Ben Lorenz (a)
1st U.S. Open. Oregon qualifier, Age 20. Oklahoma sophomore.

151. Charlie Reiter (a)
1st U.S. Open. California qualifier. Age 22. University of San Diego. Played 2018 Amex on sponsor invite (MC)

152. Caleb Manuel (a)
1st U.S. Open. New York qualifier. Age 20. UConn junior. Big East Player of Year.

153. Erik Barnes
1st major. Georgia qualifier. Age 34.

154. Sean Jacklin
1st U.S. Open. Florida qualifier. Age 30. Son of 1970 U.S. Open champion Tony Jacklin. Has played events on PGA, Korn Ferry and Latinoamerica Tours.

155. Andrew Beckler
1st U.S. Open. Maryland qualifier. Age 25. Played at Washburn University

156. Brady Calkins
1st U.S. Open. Oregon qualifier. Age 27. Plays on the Dakotas Tour.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Len Hochberg
Len Hochberg has covered golf for RotoWire since 2013. A veteran sports journalist, he was an editor and reporter at The Washington Post for many years. He was named 2020 "DFS Writer of the Year" by the FSWA and was nominated for the same award in 2019.
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